What’s your gender? When did you decide it? How much say do you have in your gender? Is there is anything about your gender or gender role that gets in your way? What would happen if you transgressed those roles? These are the sorts of questions Kate Bornstein asks as a self-described nonbinary transfeminine diesel femme dyke in hir part coming-of-age, part mind bending manifesto on gender and sexuality, Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us.

Published in 1994, Gender Outlaw was years ahead of its time. Now, a little over twenty years later, it is a recognized classic in the world of gender and queer theory that continues to expose new readers to a daring world of gender anarchy, rebellion, fluidity, and creativity; a world where gender ambiguity can and should be explored and everything everyone is supposed to just know about gender is brought into question. This world of gender outlaws comes alive through Bornstein’s fun, quirky, personal style with a combination of cultural criticism, autobiography, and dramatic writing.

As a cultural critic Bornstein tackles many common assumptions about sex, gender, and sexuality from the idea sex and gender are the same and gender and sexuality are interdependent traits. The main assertions Bornstein makes include gender is a cultural rather a cultural phenomenon distinct from biological sex and it does not determine sexual orientation. If it did what that make someone who is attracted to someone who is nonbinary?

Bornstein enhances hir cultural criticism with autobiographical content that gives readers a window (or, perhaps, a mirror) into the experiences of someone who does not live outside of the gender binary most of the population takes for granted. As someone who is neither a man or a woman, has experienced a gender transition from male to female, and is a trans elder Bornstein through means of autobiography manages to make hir theories speak to lived experience and come alive.

Also eaders who are interested in queer theater will appreciate the inclusion of Bornstein’s play, Hidden: A Gender, and its creative exploration of gender ambiguity and fluidity. By the end many readers and audiences will be left with new questions to examine and new gender possibilities to see.

While Gender Outlaw may not be for  the feint of heart, I would recommend it to anyone who wishes to gain a better understanding of gender and sexuality. Some, in the process of exploration, may find the issues of gender, sexuality, and desire Bornstein addresses speak to them more than they expected.

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