Ever wished there was an accessible, go-to source of information with colorful illustrations you could use to explain your lesser known identity when coming out to family and friends? Ever wished there was a comprehensive source of basic LGBT+ terms you can turn to for learning about the new identities you’re hearing come up more and more frequently? Maybe a friend or family member just came out as an identity you’ve never heard of and you want to learn more about it in an effort to better support them. Well now there’s a source for that: The ABCs of LGBT+ by Ash Hardell (aka Ashley Mardell), a Youtuber who’s channel focuses on LGBT+ issues and education.

With the input of knowledgeable editors from various LGBT+ organizations and LGBT+ bloggers, this helpful guide covers a range of topics from spectrums to gender identities to romantic and sexual identities. This includes an entire introduction to sex/gender with an entire section devoted to intersex complete with direct input from an intersex person and spectrums to help illustrate the sex diversity of humanity beyond male and female. The fact intersex is given its own section entirely separate from the chapter on gender identities helps to address the common confusion between intersex and nonbinary identities. Such confusion is understandable given the common cultural tendency to think of gender exclusively through the lens of biological essentialism. However, the fact of the matter is gender and sex are separate, socially constructed categories and an intersex person’s biology as such does not dictate their gender identity. We can identify as any gender along the spectrum and beyond or even have no gender at all. Many of us identify as men and women in agreement with our birth assigned genders. Some of us contested our assigned genders and identify as transgender men and women or some form of nonbinary. As so many feminists have put it, “Biology is NOT destiny.” In this sense intersex is not a gender identity in the same way nonbinary, transgender, and cisgender are all gender identities. Rather intersex as an identity is based on biological sex in a social world instead of psychosocial gender.

Beyond the information on intersex the text contains a wealth of information on lesser known gender identities such as genderflux, maverique, pangender, and demigender complete with input from individuals who actually identify with these terms. There are very few texts that show case such an expansive, informative, and well researched list of gender identities all in one place and to make it even better the section on romantic and sexual identities is just as expansive and informative. Not only does it include lesser known identities like androsexual, omnisexual, and polysexual, there is also a high level of quality ace/aro representation throughout the chapter. Ace and aro are slang terms for asexual and aromantic, words that refer to those who experience little to no sexual and romantic attraction respectively. Often these identities are lost in the plus of LGBT+ even within gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender spaces. That is why the inclusion of these identities in books like The ABCs of LGBT+ is so important.

Now, to be fair, readers who are familiar with the more radical works of queer theorists like Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, and Dean Spade may find The ABCs of LGBT+ to be too basic and lacking in depth. However, as the title suggests, the text is intended to cover a wide range of basic information for a wide audience. In this way what the text lacks in depth it makes up for in breadth. Plus thanks to the efforts of Hardell and their contributors many readers who otherwise would never have heard of identities like demisexual, homoromantic, androgyne, and neutrois are now familiar with these often ignored identities and maybe have some new terms to help explain their own experiences. I know it has proven helpful in my own gender questioning and achieving my goal of becoming more knowledgeable on gender, sexual, and romantic identities beyond all of the binaries.

In the end as an activist, advocate, educator, and member of the queer community I would recommend this book as a guide to those who are questioning their identity as well as to those who wish to start educating themselves on LGBT+ topics and become better allies in the process. While the text only scratches the surface of LGBT+ identities, let alone queer politics, The ABCs of LGBT+ is effective in achieving its goals when it comes to educating readers on the basics of sex/gender, gender expression, sexuality, romantic attraction, and LGBT+ identities.

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